Rentel substation sails away for offshore installation

Wednesday, 10 January, 2018 - 17:45

The substation for the Rentel offshore wind farm is expected to sail away from the STX yard in Saint-Nazaire, France on January 12, 2018. The offshore installation is scheduled for mid-January 2018.

The 1,200 tonnes substation will collect and export the power generated by the 42 wind turbines at the 309 MW Rentel offshore wind farm, currently being constructed off the Belgian coast. The offshore installation of the substation will be carried out mid-January with Scaldis’ heavy lift crane vessel ‘Rambiz’.

A strong and reliable partnership

DEME has been working in a close partnership with STX France and General Electric which was key to the successful delivery of the substation. This project was an opportunity to demonstrate the partners’ joint capabilities in offering integrated solutions to offshore wind customers. The combination of General Electric’s extensive know-how in the field of high voltage electrical equipment, STX value-adding expertise in offshore power transmission and DEME’s leading expertise in providing tailored solutions for the offshore wind industry enabled the partners to successfully deliver this challenging project.

Last year GeoSea successfully completed the installation of the monopile foundations and transition pieces with the jack-up installation vessel ‘Innovation’, as well as the foundation for the substation. Infield and export cables have been installed by DEME’s subsidiary Tideway. Installation of the turbines by GeoSea is scheduled in Q2 2018. With their peak height of 183 meters they will be the largest wind turbines thus far in the Belgian North Sea.

The Rentel project contributes to Belgium’s leading role within offshore wind energy, the achievement of the Belgian 2020 goals, the EU climate standards and the transition to a sustainable energy supply, reducing reliance on fossil fuels and nuclear power.

The first power is expected to be injected in the Belgian grid by mid-2018.

Source: DEME Group

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